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Art Contest Seeks to Bag ‘Poo-lution’

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More than 389,000 dogs live in Philadelphia according to a formula used by the American Veterinary Medical Association, and while most owners pick up after their pets, not all of them do. That is why the Philadelphia Water Department, together with the Partnership for the Delaware Estuary, is challenging students in grades six through 12 to create 30-second videos showing how to keep pet waste from “poo-luting” local waters.

More than 389,000 dogs live in Philadelphia according to a formula used by the American Veterinary Medical Association, and while most owners pick up after their pets, not all of them do.  That is why the Philadelphia Water Department, together with the Partnership for the Delaware Estuary, is challenging students in grades six through 12 to create 30-second videos showing how to keep pet waste from “poo-luting” local waters.

 

In addition, students in kindergarten through grade 12 are invited to submit drawings depicting ways to prevent other forms of stormwater runoff pollution to compete in the “Protect Philadelphia’s Hidden Streams” Art Contest.  The deadline for entries is March 5 and participants, as well as their teachers, are eligible to win cash prizes up to $100 in value.  Winning drawings will also serve to educate others when they appear in a SEPTA advertising campaign this spring and an exhibit inside Philadelphia International Airport’s Youth Art Gallery next winter.

 

“Many people don’t realize it, but pet waste is a major source of water pollution,” said Cheryl Jackson, a program specialist with the Partnership for the Delaware Estuary.  “This and other contaminants, like motor oil and litter, for example, can get washed into storm drains, underground streams, or the Delaware and Schuylkill Rivers, and this hurts the environment.”

 

Last year more than 1,500 students at 25 schools entered the “Protect Philadelphia’s Hidden Streams” Art Contest, and millions more saw their art in advertisements.  To see art created by those who won, please visit Flickr.com, keyword “Philadelphia’s Streams.”

 

Most of Philadelphia’s natural streams were buried approximately 200 years ago to carry wastewater and contain floods.  By burying them, the natural streams were changed into hidden streams, but these can still be sources of pollution affecting people and wildlife downstream in the Delaware Estuary.

Please call Jackson at (800) 445-4935, extension 112, to learn more about water pollution and the “Protect Philadelphia’s Hidden Streams” Art Contest.  Entry forms and additional details can be found at www.DelawareEstuary.org, the online home of the Partnership for the Delaware Estuary.