home

Anonymous Posting Suspended

Due to insufficient human labor to deal with the large amount of spam and other posts which do not meet the site newswire article policy, anonymous posting is temporarily suspended. Stay tuned.
Open Newswire
Editoral Policy | Webeditorial

Newswire Archive                   Hidden

police brutality

  • warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/members/phillyimc/sites/phillyimc.org/web/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.module on line 1421.
  • warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/members/phillyimc/sites/phillyimc.org/web/sites/all/modules/mailhandler/mailhandler.module on line 855.
by

Cell phone video shows Philadelphia woman struck by police officer at Puerto Rican Day parade Festival de Las Americas; woman charged with disorderly conduct.

Excerpt from the story:
The executive director of Concilio, which puts on the parade every year, called on police to fully investigate: 

"While thousands of people celebrated at Concilio’s Puerto Rican Day Parade on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, an unexplainable incident was taking place at a community-run activity in North Philadelphia.  

While we have no knowledge of what led to the incident, it is clear from the video that a police officer unnecessarily and brutally struck a woman in the face. 

by

The reality of racial profiling and police brutality is a direct result of 1% of the population controlling the wealth of this nation. The school to prison line is creating the new millennium plantation with the incarceration of so many minorities. 44 years after the assassination of Dr.King is the development of the Occupy Movement. It's time to join in and take a stand against the injustice of poverty.

Insensitive racist minds sabotage The existence of humanity calling for insanity In a time of black shrines found in the hand of the Devine Whose dreams are shattered hopes scattered But to most people it doesn't matter  Because in the midst of poverty there is no equality Only eyes filled with tears knowing heartache is near Because police brutality has become the reality How do we scream for Trayvon or Ramarley? What can we do for Danroy and Amadu? I’m talking about the black boy mothers' blues The black boy mothers' blues…

by

As Occupy Philly comes to terms with the recent police violence, I can almost hear the white radicals gloating that they were right: "see the police are NOT our friends after all".

Silly I say, but more like dangerous.

As Occupy Philly comes to terms with the recent police violence, I can almost hear the white radicals gloating that they were right: "see the police are NOT our friends after all".
Silly I say, but more like dangerous.
First off, the white radicals, and I count myself as one, studied and maybe experienced, as I have, the painful history of police violence, so they were right about one thing: police have used violence against peaceful protesters in the past and there's no reason to assume they won't do so again. So in a way, they were right all along. But I think the "police are NOT our friends" idea is just as a shallow, divisive, and dangerous as thinking police actually are our friends. Here's why.

by

Key unions are on board and will shut down construction sites and the Port of Oakland

Scott Olsen Cannot Talk Due to the Brain Injury Caused by Police Violence

General Strike and Mass Protest on Weds. Nov. 2nd!

Drop the Charges Against All Occupy Protesters!

By Steven Argue

by

We have seen the current 'Battle of Oakland', but this wasn't the first such 'battle' the City's police have waged on peaceful protesters. In a democratic society, one would hope it's 'a crime' if those exercising their constitutionally guaranteed right to dissent become targeted as 'an enemy', with no small paradox when an Iraq vet -- who supposedly fought to bring democracy and freedom -- is seriously wounded for peacefully demonstrating at home.

Courageous 2003 protester
 
OpEd News - "Occupy, the 'Battles of Oakland', and the Face of US Police Abuse"
by Ritt Goldstein
Copyright October 2011

by
author: 
Ritt Goldstein
Summary: 

We have seen the current 'Battle of Oakland', but this wasn't the first such 'battle' the City's police have waged on peaceful protesters. In a democratic society, one would hope it's 'a crime' if those exercising their constitutionally guaranteed right to dissent become targeted as 'an enemy', with no small paradox when an Iraq vet -- who supposedly fought to bring democracy and freedom -- is seriously wounded for peacefully demonstrating at home.

OpEd News - "Occupy, the 'Battles of Oakland', and the Face of US Police Abuse"
by Ritt Goldstein
Copyright October 2011

On Tuesday riot police raided the ongoing Occupy demonstration in Oakland, California, beginning a period of sustained police violence against the protesters.   But, this 'battle' against those exercising the right to peaceful protest isn't Oakland's first.

image: 
Courageous_Wounded_2003_Protester.jpg
by

Given the police actions in Oakland, the arrests in Atlanta, in a real way it's a measure of Occupy's success that such a 'climate of repression' exists. However, the key question is what will the 'climate' facing the courageous become, how far will America's police -- police that are a real part of the victimized 99% -- actually go? I personally can well recall Spring 1970, when the National Guard shot and killed four protesting students at Kent State University, the 'Kent State Massacre'. As one such memory in a lifetime is too many, are our government and its police truly eager to provide Occupy and America with more martyrs?

Occupy Wall Street and the Criminalization of Non-violent Dissent

By Ritt Goldstein
http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article29516.htm

October 25, 2011 "Information Clearing House" -- 'Semper fi' is all one can say after watching video of Sergeant Shamar Thomas, a marine who indeed seems to proudly recall the oath he took to "support and defend the Constitution of the United States", the rights to peaceful protest contained in it. In defending Occupy demonstrators, Thomas told NYPD that there was "no honor" in brutalizing unarmed US citizens, and that's a message that's long needed delivery.

by

This is an in-depth analysis of the neighborhood based Peoples Court movement which emerged in September in response to the near death beating of Askia Sabur.

GroupWithFlag.jpg
yes7.jpg
462902.jpg

The black working class is currently leading the way in the development of new forms of revolutionary organization in Philadelphia. This is reflected in the community based People’s Courts that formed in response to the near death beating of Askia Sabur in West Philadelphia on September 3rd, 2010. Askia had not complied with police orders to leave a street corner as he was waiting for his food at a Chinese store in his community, on 55th and Lansdowne.
 

by

After midnight on Thursday, December 9, 2010 the Puerto Rican police force, including SWAT forces broke into the Rio Piedras campus of the University of Puerto Rico (UPR), as well as other campuses. For more information, check out student-run news at www.radiohuelga.com, www.rojogallito.com or for English language news, www.dailysunpr.org.

After midnight on Thursday, December 9, 2010 the Puerto Rican police force, including SWAT forces broke into the Rio Piedras campus of the University of Puerto Rico (UPR), as well as other campuses. In multiple police cars, jeeps, and passenger vans, various branches of the police force, including the SWAT team in full riot gear entered the campus, after being prohibited from doing so for over 31 years. Puerto Rico’s ultra-conservative governor, Luis Fortuño, and his political ally the UPR president Jose Ramon de la Torre broke the non-confrontation policy even after the campus dean said that police would not enter after striking students left.

by

PHILADELPHIA — On Friday, September 17, organizations such as the New Black Panther Party, MOVE, Poor Righteous Party of the Black Nation, the Uhuru Solidarity Movement and the International People’s Democratic Uhuru Movement (InPDUM) marched with the African community and the family of Askia Sabur on the 19th police district, demanding justice for Askia and the entire black community.

PHILADELPHIA — On Friday, September 17, organizations such as the New Black Panther Party, MOVE, Poor Righteous Party of the Black Nation, the Uhuru Solidarity Movement and the International People’s Democratic Uhuru Movement (InPDUM) marched with the African community and the family of Askia Sabur on the 19th police district, demanding justice for Askia and the entire black community.

Brother Askia Sabur is a 29-year-old African man who was savagely beaten by a mob of black cops in West Philly in front of a Chinese restaraunt on 55th St. and Landsdowne Ave.

Syndicate content