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In another focused assault upon the scourge of drugs in our Tampa Bay communities, the local chapter of the Foundation for a Drug-Free World, an international educational organization established to empower individuals with factual information about drugs, mobilized their volunteers to hand out more than 6,000 booklets this past weekend.

These ten different drug education booklets delineate, in detailed but understandable term, the effects of all common illegal street drugs, as well as many prescription drugs when abused. 

 

Each booklet covers one specific drug, such as heroin, cocaine, painkillers, marijuana and even alcohol.  Each is written in a simple and straightforward manner that leads the reader to make a rational decision not to use or abuse drugs based on facts and not just an emotional pitch.

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How often parents tell their children not to play with matches, talk to strangers or stay out late? In most cases, a parent’s fear is that such warnings will go unheeded.

What happens then if one tries to educate a child about the dangers of drug use, especially in a world where children as young as 12 buy and sell crack cocaine and other street drugs to their friends? As long as a son or daughter is under the parents’ watchful eye, the problem is not as threatening. But what happens when mother or father are not around?

  

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Foundation for a Drug Free World’s uses educational materials to attack dangerous and addictive painkillers.

July 25, 2010 – Clearwater, Fl – Pain management clinics are set up specifically to provide addictive pain medication to their clients.   While some individuals with serious injuries may have a valid need for strong pain-relieving drugs, a large number of the customers of these “pill mills” simply need the drugs to satisfy an addiction.  Many travel hundreds of miles across state lines to get the highly addictive Oxycontin, Vicodin, Oxycodone, Percoset or other similar drugs.

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Illicit drug and alcohol use is a fact of life in today’s society. To use or not to use such substances is a decision which all young people must address for themselves at an early age.

Governments, schools and social programs have attempted to forestall such abusive behavior by young people through school and community based programs as well as broad advertising campaigns, taxation and law enforcement. Yet the continued presence of substance abuse by youth in this country is unquestionable testimony to the fact that we need to do a more effective job for the sake of our young people and the well-being of our society.

If a young person hasn’t firmly decided not to start drugs by age 11, it is late to start talking to him about the subject.

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Growing up and living in this world can be very hard. Making the right choice is not easy sometimes.

Drugs are essentially poisons. The amount taken determines the effect. 

 

A small amount acts as a stimulant (increases activity). A greater amount acts as a sedative (suppresses activity). A still larger amount poisons and can kill. 

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Tampa, FL - Those who are proponents of medical marijuana would have you think that anyone who opposes the legalization of this drug is anti-help and pro-pain. After all, the chronically ill are said to benefit from the use of marijuana while undergoing chemotherapy or when suffering from pain or other chronic health conditions.

And they would have you believe that the debate should end right there.

 

Not so fast. Any examination of the subject must include a look at the wider effects that legalization could be having. Certainly, a thorough study of the subject would fill a book. Still, an examination of a few statistics released by the federal government on the effects this drug is having on our country would provide a little more context to the arguments for or against legalization for medical purposes.

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An Australian court finds that the existing drug laws, by reversing the onus of proof, violate the presumption of innocence. But all convictions stand. To any legislator who willingly allows the reverse onus of proof to continue, I say: May it please God that you become a victim of it.

Read the full text at OpEdNews (Mar.26, 2010).

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It seems to be simple at first. A student gets a little behind in his studies. An exam comes up and he needs to prepare. He’ll have to stay up late to have even a chance of making the grade. Coffee gives him the jitters, but many of his friends use these pills to give the extra energy they need. Why not? A couple of bucks; one pill; an entire night of study; a feeling of “focus”.

Ritalin is the common name for methylphenidate, classified by the Drug Enforcement Administration as a Schedule II narcotic – the same classification as cocaine, morphine and amphetamines.

 

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By unleashing this new generation of American, Canadian and British etc. mass murderers on the town of Marjah in Helmand province in Afghanistan, Barrack Obama continues to prove that he is just as much a tool of Yankee Imperialism as was George W. Bush.

Obama Radically Advances The Great American Tradition Of Committing Mass Murder Against the World's Poorest People.

By Lloyd Hart

By unleashing this new generation of American, Canadian and British etc. mass murderers on the town of Marjah in Helmand province in Afghanistan, Barrack Obama continues to prove that he is just as much a tool of Yankee Imperialism as was George W. Bush.

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Marijuana is the most commonly used illegal drug in the world.

According to the United Nations, 158.8 million people around the world use marijuana – more than 3.8% of the planet’s population.

Marijuana is the word used to describe the dried flowers, seeds and leaves of the Indian hemp plant. It is usually green, brown or gray in color. On the streets, it is called by many other names, such as: astro, turf, dope, dogga, grass, hemp, Mary Jane, pot and weed.

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